Munich Personal RePEc Archive

The Effects of Supervisor-Subordinate Genders on Subordinates’ Involvement Across Managerial Functions

Hasan, Syed Akif and Subhani, Muhammad Imtiaz (2011): The Effects of Supervisor-Subordinate Genders on Subordinates’ Involvement Across Managerial Functions. Published in: Interdisciplinary Journal of Contemporary Research in Business , Vol. 3, No. 2 (2011): pp. 314-324.

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Abstract

One of the renowned agendas’ of the management study around the globe encircles the gender biasness or non-biasness in performing the basic managerial functions. Pertaining to the factual studies, mixed views have been brought to light that whether male supervisors have a good relationship with male subordinates or female subordinates and whether female supervisors have good relationship with female subordinates or male subordinates. It is often assumed that cross gender supervisor subordinate relationships are better than same gender supervisor subordinate relationships. The involvement of subordinates in the four managerial functions namely planning, organizing, controlling and motivating are investigated to conclude the effects of gender on subordinate involvement in management functions by the supervisors. A sample of 1000 respondents were specifically chosen from banking sector to identify if gender of supervisor and subordinate has any effect on subordinates’ involvement across managerial functions. To achieve this, firstly, mean of male supervisor with same and cross gender subordinates is compared on the basis of their involvement in managerial functions through applying the split analysis. Results revealed that male supervisors involve male subordinates more in managerial functions than female subordinates. As for female supervisors they have the same level of involvement of both the genders across managerial functions but somehow these involvements are more towards the male subordinates.

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