Logo
Munich Personal RePEc Archive

The Origins and Long-Run Consequences of the Division of Labor

Depetris-Chauvin, Emilio and Özak, Ömer (2016): The Origins and Long-Run Consequences of the Division of Labor.

WarningThere is a more recent version of this item available.
[img]
Preview
PDF
MPRA_paper_74703.pdf

Download (1MB) | Preview

Abstract

This research explores the deep historical roots and persistent effects of the division of labor in pre-modern societies. It advances the hypothesis, and establishes empirically that population diversity had a positive causal effect on the division of labor. Based on a novel ethnic level dataset combining geocoded ethnographic, linguistic and genetic data, this research exploits the exogenous variation in population diversity generated by historical migratory patterns to causally establish that higher levels of population diversity were conducive to economic specialization and the emergence of trade-related institutions that, in turn, translated into differences in pre-modern comparative development. Additionally, this research provides suggestive evidence that regions historically inhabited by pre-modern societies with higher levels of economic specialization have higher levels of contemporary occupational heterogeneity, economic complexity and development.

Available Versions of this Item

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact us: mpra@ub.uni-muenchen.de

This repository has been built using EPrints software.

MPRA is a RePEc service hosted by Logo of the University Library LMU Munich.